Another Failed President?

by Patrick J. Buchanan In Year One of the Reagan Revolution, in which he was a shining star, Budget Director David Stockman told reporter William Greider: “Kemp-Roth (President Reagan’s 1981 tax cut) was always a Trojan horse to bring down the top rate. … It’s kind of hard to sell ‘trickle down.’ So the supply-side […]

The Anti-Reagan

By Patrick J. Buchanan Despite his boldness, Barack Obama seems as fated to fail as were Woodrow Wilson and Jimmy Carter. And for the same reason: a belief in his own righteousness and moral superiority, and a belief that his ideals and his persona count mightily in the modern world. Wilson declaimed about America’s fight […]

Jim Crow Liberalism

By Patrick J. Buchanan Having lost both houses of Congress and the White House in two straight elections, Republicans are going through an identity crisis, its leaders holding town hall meetings to “listen” to the people. “What should we focus on? Should we drop the social issues? How do we get the young people back?” […]

A Neo-Reaganite Inaugural

By Patrick J. Buchanan With a host of near 2 million gathered on the Mall to see him sworn in, Barack Obama delivered an inaugural that was the antithesis of a rallying cry for the “it’s-our-turn!” faithful assembled below. Rather, it was an admonition, a warning to the American people of the gravity of our […]

Is GOP Still a National Party?

By Patrick J. Buchanan As President Barack Obama delivers his inaugural address to a nation filled with anticipation and hope, the vital signs of the loyal opposition appear worse than worrisome. The new majority of 49 states and 60 percent of the nation Nixon cobbled together in 1972, that became the Reagan coalition of 49 […]

Obama’s Choice: FDR or Reagan

By Patrick J. Buchanan Barack Obama, it is said, will inherit the worst times since the Great Depression. Not to minimize the crisis we are in, but we need a little perspective here. The Great Depression began with the Great Crash of 1929. By 1931, unemployment had reached 16 percent. By 1933, 89 percent of […]