Is a U.S. Default Inevitable?

By Patrick J. Buchanan As President Bush prepared to invade Iraq in September 2002, the head of his economic policy council, Lawrence Lindsey publicly estimated such a war could cost $100 billion to $200 billion. Lindsey had committed candor, and the stunned Bushites came down on him with both feet. “Baloney,” said Donald Rumsfeld. The […]

Return of the Anti-Interventionist Right

By Patrick J. Buchanan Late last month, when U.S. air strikes caused civilian casualties in Afghanistan, an angry Hamid Karzai issued an ultimatum. If future U.S. strikes are not restricted, we will take “unilateral action” and America may be treated like an “occupying power.” That brought this blistering retort from one Republican hawk. “If President […]

When Dictators Fall, Who Rises?

By Patrick J. Buchanan One month before the invasion of Iraq, Riah Abu el-Assal, a Palestinian and the Anglican bishop of Jerusalem at the time, warned Tony Blair, “You will be responsible for emptying Iraq, the homeland of Abraham, of Christians.” The bishop proved a prophet. “After almost 2,000 years,” writes the Financial Times, “Iraqi […]

Losing the Will to Fight

by Patrick J. Buchanan Five years have elapsed since the war on terror began on 9/11. Yet even before nearly 3,000 were killed that day, there had been attacks by Islamic radicals on the World Trade Center, Khobar Towers, our embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, and the USS Cole. U.S. dead in those attacks was […]