Remembering Wars and Warriors

by Patrick J. Buchanan Since America became a nation, four of her greatest generals have served two terms as president: George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Ulysses Grant and Dwight David Eisenhower. Not one of these generals led America into a new war. Washington was heroic in keeping the young republic out of the wars that erupted […]

The War Over America’s Past

By Patrick J. Buchanan “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.” That was the slogan of the Ministry of Truth in George Orwell’s “1984,” where Winston Smith worked ceaselessly revising the past to conform to the latest party line of Big Brother. And so we come to the […]

The New Intolerance

by Patrick J. Buchanan “This was a recognition of American terrorists.” That is CNN’s Roland Martin’s summary judgment of the 258,000 men and boys who fell fighting for the Confederacy in a war that cost as many American lives as World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam and Iraq combined.

James K. Polk: Forgotten Great

By Patrick J. Buchanan As America debates whether to send tens of thousands more troops to Afghanistan, in the ninth year of a war for ends we cannot discern, a riveting new history recalls times when Americans fought for vital national interests.

Is America Coming Apart?

by Patrick J. Buchanan Flying home from London, where the subject of formal debate on the 70th anniversary of World War II had been whether Winston Churchill was a liability or asset to the Free World, one arrives in the middle of a far more acrimonious national debate right here in the United States. At […]

Mr. Lincoln’s War: An Irrepressible Conflict?

by Patrick J. Buchanan This article first appeared in the October 1997 issue of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture. It was adapted from a book manuscript. [T]he contest is really for empire on the side of the North, and for independence on that of the South, and in this respect we recognize an exact […]